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Author Archives: Alex Kidman

Apple’s new iPad Pro is powerful, but it’s not for everyone

Apple’s recently released its latest range of iPad Pro tablets, with a specific pitch towards creative professionals. That’s due to the underlying A12X Bionic processor, a more powerful version of the chip found in its Apple iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max and iPhone XR phones. I’ve spent the last couple of weeks testing and evaluating the new 12.9 inch iPad Pro. Apple also makes a slightly less expensive 11 inch model with the same internal processor if you favour a little portability over screen size.

The A12X Fusion is indeed very fast, and there’s a lot of promise as to what it will be able to to with applications that are set to arrive on the iPad very soon. Key to this will be Adobe’s range of applications, including Adobe Photoshop. Apple’s shown demos of Photoshop running very quickly on an iPad Pro, and in combination with the Apple Pencil, it could be a great creative canvas to rival approaches like Wacom’s tablets or Microsoft’s Surface Pro line.

Apple’s tinkered with the Apple Pencil too. It now magnetically attaches to the side of the new iPad Pro, and charges when it does via inductive charging. As such, it should never really go “flat” to speak of. I’m not much of a visual artist, so I can’t say I’ve detected major changes in sensitivity, although the new double tap to change tools feature has a lot of promise.

There’s a big catch if you’re a fan of the existing Apple Pencil, and especially if you own one and are considering an upgrade to the new iPad Pro. The older model charged over lightning, but Apple’s swapped that out for USB C charging on the new iPad Pros, so you would’t be able to charge it, but it’s actually more fundamental than that. The old Apple Pencil won’t connect to the new iPad Pro, and the new Apple Pencil won’t connect to the old models either. That means if you want to upgrade, you’ll have to buy an all-new Apple Pencil, and you won’t be able to share its use with owners of older iPad Pro models either.

I’ve been using the iPad Pro as my secondary computer over the past couple of weeks, and that’s for a reason. It’s very powerful, and as a writing tool — which is what I do — it works well, especially paired with Apple’s new Smart Keyboard Folio case. Still, while it’s powerful and the battery life is good, it’s still an iOS device. That means that while you can plug in USB C accessories, not all of them will work the same way they might on a PC or Mac computer.

External drives, for example, aren’t well supported, and it’s a bit of a guessing game for other peripherals. Apple maintains iOS as a locked down and secure system, and while that has advantages for security memory management — the iPad Pro does stuff with just 4GB of RAM that you’d never see on a full Mac with that little memory — it also limits what you can do in choosing apps to install, moving files around and even multitasking.

At its asking price, the iPad Pro could be a good match for your professional needs if you’re highly portable and the applications you rely on don’t rely on much multitasking, or save exclusively to the cloud. However, it’s not inexpensive, and if what you want is more in the standard “watch, read and listen to content” tablet model, the regular iPad, which is much cheaper, is still the better bet. The iPad Pro is great, but it’s a computer for perhaps 10% or less of the tablet market. For the rest of us, a regular iPad is a better buy.


Foldable phones will lead to foldable laptops

It wasn’t all that long ago (in strictly historical terms) that the majority of computers sold were in desktop form. That’s the style with a central case, external monitor, keyboard and mouse, although that description also suits many of the integrated systems such as Apple’s iMac lines are as “desktop” PCs.

We’ve now shifted well and truly to an era where the majority of computers sold (and therefore owned) are laptops — portable (or at least semi-portable) units where all the components of the computer are in a single case, including monitor, keyboard, mouse (typically in trackpad form) and batteries for power. Of course, some notebooks are more portable than others, and there’s a wide variety of styles, approaches and price points, from cheap student laptops all the way up to hyper-expensive gaming or ultraportable laptops for business use.

While there’s been some challenge to the laptop of late via tablets, most notably Apple’s range of iPad and iPad Pro devices, there’s not been a lot of change in laptops to speak of. That could be about to change, however.

Samsung recently showed off a prototype of an upcoming Samsung Galaxy handset at its Samsung Developer Conference using what it calls the “Infinity Flex Display”. It’s a foldable smartphone, with a choice of screens depending on how you want to use it.

It’s easiest to describe the function as Samsung’s revealed it around the idea of a book. The front cover is an essentially smartphone-sized panel that works like a current smartphone, but when you open it up, revealing what would be two “pages” in a book, you’ve got a larger, more tablet-sized device. Samsung hasn’t said when it might bring a phone to market with its Infinity Flex Display on board, but it’s already got a lot of competition lining up. Chinese maker Huawei is expected to launch a foldable phone device sometime in 2019, while makers such as LG, Motorola and even Apple have patents that describe very similar devices.

You might not care so much about a foldable phone, but the reality for this technology is that could easily have a transformative effect on the laptops of tomorrow as well.

While there’s likely to be a space for a foldable phone that can become a tablet, depending on the strength of your flexible material, there’s also scope for larger displays and virtual keyboards — which means that you could scale it up to a more standard laptop size while delivering a device that folds away much more neatly for travel purposes while still giving you key information.

Imagine one of today’s smaller tablets, but one that could fold outwards into a larger display. We’re already some of the way there with devices like Microsoft’s Surface Pro or Apple’s iPad Pro, but adding a literal twist to the display formula opens up a whole world of possibilities when it comes to both shapes for aesthetic purposes and functional design for new laptop form factors.

None of this means that the existing world of laptops will simply vanish overnight. After all, you can still buy desktop PCs if you prefer that style, or simply want a machine that’s a little easier to upgrade. The first foldable laptops will no doubt attract premium prices, keeping them just for a niche of cashed-up users at first.

Over time, though, and as the technology improves, we could find ourselves swapping out the old-fashioned idea of having a phone, tablet and laptop for one single device that expands and contracts to meet all of these needs at once.


Is now the time to consider smart lightbulbs?

Lightbulbs, in one form or another, have been around for over 200 years. The first light bulbs were highly experimental, highly expensive, and not entirely practical up until Thomas Edison’s twist on the bulbs that had been produced before made it more practical for everyday use. We’ve shifted (largely) from those early incandescent filament lightbulbs into a world with compact fluorescent bulbs and, increasingly, LED lit lightbulbs. They’re lighter, brighter, safer, longer lasting and generally lower in their power usage.

Then there’s so-called “smart” lightbulbs. These are generally of the LED type, which means that they can not only be produced in different shapes and with differing intensities and base colours, but also depending on the precise make and model, can also be semi-programmable. That sounds complex, but for the majority of lights, it’s a simple matter of using a phone-based app to select the brightness, in some cases the colour temperature and in others the actual colour of the bulb to best suit your mood.

Smart app-controlled lightbulbs have been around for some years now, but what we’re increasingly seeing are lightbulbs that aren’t only smart in the app sense, but that are also smart to the world of personal digital assistants such as Apple’s Siri (and accompanying HomeKit platform), Amazon’s Alexa or Google’s Assistant. This means that with a little tweaking for your smart home speakers, you can control your lights, group them into sensible patterns for events such as parties, movie watching, or just when you get home after work or up at night to get a glass of water and much more all with just your voice. For want of a better term, they’re “smarter” lights.

There’s plenty of them, however, under a wide variety of brand names, all with slightly different features. So what should you look out for when buying smart light bulbs?

  • Will it work with my digital assistant? Some bulbs will work only with Google Assistant, or Alexa, or Siri. Some will work with all three. If you’ve got a mix of Amazon, Android and iOS devices, flexibility could be a big plus, but if you’re only using one platform, it doesn’t make sense to spend extra if you don’t have to.
  • What kinds of shapes can I get? Bulbs are bulbs, right? Well, not so much if you have fancy light fixtures they have to work around, or bulbs mounted vertically in walls. You may want to check if the brand you’re choosing offers alternate shapes or sizes to accomodate other light fixtures around them.
  • Can I do colours? Most lights will let you change the intensity of the brightness, and some may let you change the colour temperature, from cooler white/blue mixes to warmer white/yellow types. Others, however, offer a full disco style experience, so if you want that low red room for romance (or Halloween!), you can do it. Not a vital feature for some folks, of course, but if you want it and your brand doesn’t support it, it’s a problem.
  • E27 or B22? There are two common light fixture types worldwide. E27, often called the “Edison” or “screw” type uses a simple threaded screw to fit in, and is more common globally, but you may have B22, or “bayonet” types, distinguishable by the prongs that stick out from the sides and form the fixture point for your lights. If you’re looking at changing over your entire house over time, it’s worth checking each bulb, as some houses — especially those with a few years that may have seen a few odd electrical choices in their time — might surprise you.
  • Do I need new wiring, or a central hub? Some devices act as standalone bulbs with no need for a central hub, although this type often doesn’t work together in groups because of that fact. Other bulb types, such as the Philips Hue bulbs, work off a central “hub” device that acts as the brains. Check carefully before you start buying, because it makes sense to keep within the one system if at all possible.
  • Do you want remote control when you’re out of home? Internet-connected lights can be checked while you’re out, which is super-handy if you can’t remember if you’ve switched the lights off, or just want a light to go on for security reasons. Again, not all lights support that kind of functionality, and quite how well it works can depend on the speed and reliability of your Internet connection.
  • Do you already have dimming switches? If you’ve got existing dimmer switches for traditional incandescent lights, it’s worth checking how your brand of choice handles those. Most standard smart bulbs can dim themselves, but they don’t much like the electrical variance of an actual dimmer switch.
  • How quick do you want to change over? One of the nice things about integrating smart lighting solutions is that you don’t have to change every bulb all at once. A friend of mine is just about done with his switchover to smart lighting solutions, but he’s taken more than a year to do so, adding a bulb at a time and building up a full profile (in his case, through Google’s Home application) to cover everything from what happens when he gets home to how he wants his lights to dim when there’s an important match on he wants to watch.

While you will pay a little more for smart light bulbs, they can be very practical and useful for a wide number of scenarios. One of the more useful aspects, of course, is that they’ll still work just fine from regular light switches as well, and you generally don’t have to do any additional installation or wiring tricks to get them to work. If you buy one and decide they’re great, you can go the whole hog, but equally if you work out they’re not for you, you can simply use the bulbs you’ve already bought as regular lights, and leave it at that. Uninstallation is as simple as unscrewing a light bulb, and while there’s probably a terrible old joke in how many people that might take, typically it’s pretty easy.


Does the Surface Pro 6 hit the sweet spot?

Microsoft recently announced updated versions of its Surface Pro line of tablet/laptop hybrids, complete with 8th Generation Intel Core i5 or Core i7 processors. I’ve had a few weeks to test out the Surface Pro 6 and see if it does live up to Microsoft’s hype, and also the rather serious price points that Microsoft attaches to it.

Easily the most striking thing about the new Surface Pro 6 is the new Matte Black finish. While black laptops are nothing new, previous Surface Pro generations have all tended to come in silver — Microsoft refers to it as “platinum”, but they’re not fooling anybody — finishes only. I reviewed the new Black model, and it’s definitely a nice looking, if somewhat familiar looking device.

That has its benefits and drawbacks. The basic Surface Pro design is a very good one for a productivity tablet, with the same kickstand at the back that can accomodate multiple angles, a solid and secure build that doesn’t feel cheap and a screen that definitely focuses your attention towards your work, it’s also running on what are now older technology choices.

There’s a USB port, but it’s the older USB A, rather than USB C, and there’s only one of them. You get a mini DisplayPort interface, but Thunderbolt 3 would have been more flexible — and would have allowed for an external GPU to be added to the Surface Pro 6 for added power. Microsoft’s own Surface Connect charger is easy to use, but the lack of USB C means you must carry it around with you to keep it topped up.

In many ways, it feels like Microsoft might just be treading water with the Surface Pro 6 before doing any proper tinkering with what it wants the Surface Pro line to actually be. It’s not as portable as the Surface Go, but it is a more powerful machine overall, especially if you opt for the Core i7 version.

Where Microsoft had previously offered a quite low power Core m3 Surface Pro previously, the baseline Surface Pro 6 is a Core i5 model with 128GB of onboard storage. You can pump the storage up via microSD, with a card reader cleverly hidden under the hinge, but as always it’s wiser to buy as much storage as you think you’ll need, because Windows 10 will eat it up faster than you might think.

Battery life in my tests was fine for all-day usage as long as I wasn’t pushing it too hard. Microsoft’s own estimates put it at around 13 hours of video playback, but that’s not all that useful a test unless you only want it as a video screen. For more productivity-centric work, I’d say that 8 hours should be nicely feasible.

But should you buy one? Well, as always that depends. It’s not quite the innovative machine that previous Surface Pro devices have been, but it’s still a very good example of how to make a quality hybrid device. The fact that Microsoft still doesn’t bundle the keyboard in with the Surface Pro 6 rankles. You’ll have to pay extra for one, and I can’t imagine any Surface Pro 6 user not doing so.

You should definitely compare your options, with manufacturers like HP, Lenovo and Dell making some very spiffy 2-in-1 devices to take the fight direct to Microsoft. It feels likely that Microsoft will make some big changes for the Surface Pro 7 to stay ahead of the pack, because while the Surface Pro 6 is a fine machine, it’s really only an under-the-hood specifications bump rather than a radically new machine.


Are smartphone cameras reaching their peak?

I’m old enough to remember the days when you’d buy a roll of film, put it into a camera and take pictures that you never really “saw” until you’d taken them to a specialist processing store (often a chemist) and paid for their printing. Some were great, most were ordinary, and almost inevitably somebody would have blinked at the crucial moment during that once-in-a-lifetime family photo.

The advent of digital photography, and especially digital cameras on smartphones have changed all that. Every single day billions of photos are taken. Very few are actually printed any more, but many end up being stored in the cloud or shared via social media. We’re visual creatures as human beings, and we’ve never been quite as able to record our own lives as we are right now with even a moderately priced smartphone.

When you get into the premium space, however, your photographic options get really interesting. There are approaches like Google’s for its new Pixel 3 handsets, which offer AI-driven photography off a single lens with surprising levels of detail, but most manufacturers instead opt for multiple lenses offering up super-wide or telephoto features, as well as portrait bokeh effects to emulate the levels of details you’d get out of a decent DSLR.

I recently had the opportunity to attend the London launch of Huawei’s new Mate 20 Pro handset, the latest from the Chinese manufacturer to take on the likes of Apple and Samsung in the smartphone space. With disclosure in mind, I travelled there as a guest of Huawei.

The company had already won plaudits for its excellent Huawei P20 Pro, the world’s first generally available triple lens camera, but for the Mate 20 Pro, it’s pushed even further into the kinds of photographic features usually only found in dedicated DSLRs with much larger sensors than we’ll see in current smartphones.

Like the P20 Pro before it, the Mate 20 Pro features three sensors; one standard, one ultra-wide and one telephoto lens. The standard lens is an astonishing 40MP sensor, but by default while it captures using that resolution, it then uses AI to downsample that image into a more space-efficient optimised image, often with very good results indeed.

It does make me wonder how much further standard smartphone cameras can actually get. They’ve long surpassed the old compact style digital cameras for convenience and general quality, but there’s not much likelihood that they’ll eclipse the full pro DSLR experience.

Then again, maybe they don’t need to. If you’re very keen on digital photography, chances are you’ve already got a DSLR and an assortment of lenses. While you can buy clip-on lenses for a variety of smartphones, that’s a pale approximation of the visual quality you get from a DSLR, which benefits from a much larger sensor running its visual capture than you’ll find on a smartphone. For most of us, however, photography these days is about simplicity.

Find your subject, whether it’s a landmark or a special person in your life, point the phone and press the button. We’ve seen some remarkable leaps in the quality you can expect from smartphone cameras, which can now more elegantly handle complex scenes, low light or fast motion with a mix of quality hardware and AI optimisation. Where once you’d perhaps get a pixellated blur, now you can get stunning clarity and photos better than you might think you’re capable of capturing.

You might even want to print a few of them.


How well do you take care of your laptop?

A little TLC — or a willingness to run some simple hacks — can make a big difference in how long your computing hardware will last.

I was reminded of this recently while visiting a relative of mine who asked if I could help fix up her shaky Skype connection, and especially the audio levels on calls she was getting. But before I could even start on that, I noticed that she had another, quite separate problem with her laptop.

Specifically, the Q and C keys were missing. They’d apparently been accidentally knocked off while cleaning, and a quick examination of the key caps showed that the spring mounts (used underneath most, but not all) had also fractured, which meant that they couldn’t be simply re-clicked back into place.

Her solution — which worked fine for her as a slower two-finger typist — was simply to press down on the underlying mechanism, while also remaining thankful that the letter “Q” isn’t one that’s used extensively in English, unless you do a lot of reporting on royal matters. It drove me to distraction, but then I touch type and I’m very much used to having a responsive keyboard. The laptop itself was out of warranty by then, which made me think about alternative long-term arrangements.

Now, at one level, you could use a semi-broken keyboard as an excuse for an upgrade. That’s fine if you can afford it, although in that circumstance you really ought to look at either selling (while being honest) or donating away the older laptop once you’ve cleared all your information off it. If neither is feasible, it’s vital that it’s appropriately recycled, because the chemicals and elements within motherboards and screens are rather toxic. Old laptops should under no circumstances simply go in the bin.

But what if you didn’t have the resources for a replacement or upgraded laptop? There’s a few choices here. You could, as my relative opted to do, simply soldier on with a slightly less pretty, somewhat slower to type keyboard. Losing that top key will almost inevitably mean that those elements break down a little faster by dint of being exposed to the world, but it’s one way to work.

What if the keys themselves break down and you’re suddenly referring to Elizabeth Windsor as the “ueen”? If you’re using a touchscreen Windows device, you could always opt for the onscreen keyboard, although again that’s not a great option for touch typists, and you’ll be sacrificing screen real estate to do so.

It may be worth checking with the manufacturer around repair costs, even for older models. Consumer laws come into play here as well, depending on the cost of the laptop and its relative age, but there’s often a way to fix smaller scale problems like this, although you may incur additional cost unless there’s been some kind of recognised build issue.

Of course, one of the most flexible ways to get an older laptop with a bung keyboard back up and running is to invest in an external keyboard for it. It’s not a solution that works well for more mobile laptop users, because you’d need more lap space than any but the largest humans have, but if your laptop lives on a desk or table most of its life, plugging in a cheap keyboard is a very effective way to get yourself back up and running, and make the most out of your technology investment. If your laptop supports Bluetooth you could go fancy and get a wireless keyboard and mouse to control it from a distance, but even a very cheap USB-connected laptop will quickly get you out of a typing jam. In most cases, you’ll end up with a nicer typing experience too.


Don’t rush towards the Windows 10 October 2018 Update

Microsoft had been promising for some time that its latest large scale update to the Windows 10 operating system would arrive in October — and went so far as to simply call it the “Windows 10 October 2018 update”, as if to prove the point.

At its event to launch its new range of Surface devices, including the Surface Pro 6, Surface Laptop 2, Surface Studio 2 and even Surface Headphones, Microsoft also announced that the October 2018 would be available for qualifying PCs, effective immediately.

The October 2018 update contains a number of performance fixes and security patches, along with a number of new features to entice you to upgrade. I’ve been running it on a couple of PCs without issue, and there are some very nice tweaks. If you take a lot of screenshots — a necessity for my line of work — the new screen clipping tools are excellent and easy to use, and if you find eyestrain a real issue, the new dark explorer theme may bring you some relief.

Microsoft doesn’t just drop an operating system and push it out to everyone all at once, and that’s a sensible move most of the time. The complexity of Windows hardware and how it all works together over what are now generations of codes and silicon differences make it a very complex job, which is why unless you go searching for it, you won’t be prompted for the upgrade. There are ways to force the upgrade if you’re particularly keen — but in this case you really shouldn’t.

Surprisingly for a software package that has been through thousands of beta testers, not long after Microsoft took the upgrade public, reports emerged that some users were hitting critical errors with their Windows 10 PCs. For some users, it was a matter of being unable to access the Internet using the Microsoft Edge browser, but more problematic for others were reports of their documents folders being mysteriously deleted by the update.

Yeah, I’d say that’s a pretty big problem, as well as a reminder to always have a spare backup of your most precious files before any major OS upgrade. Given that any hard drive — mechanical or solid state — is just waiting to fail, not having a backup is like playing Russian roulette with those files. Sooner or later, they’re going to fail, and without backup, you’ll be left to cry over what you’ve lost.

Microsoft has pulled public availability of the upgrade from its server while it investigates, and it’s advising anyone who has downloaded installation media — perhaps to install it on an Internet-free PC, or across a range of business machines all at once — to hold off on the upgrade until it’s had time to investigate the issue. It is feasible that it’s some other, non-Windows 10 related issue at play here. Affected machines may have had malware, or some other obscure software-related issue that caused folder deletion. If it’s a Microsoft-led bug, however, it’s critical that it doesn’t spread, so they’ll be looking to squash it as quickly as possible.

For what it’s worth, I’ve been lucky (and yes, I do have backups) and the systems I’ve updated did so without an issue. Had I known of the issue before updating, however, I never would have risked it in the first place. In time, Microsoft should sort out whatever the problem is, and eventually, you’ll have pop-up reminders on your desktop telling you to upgrade. I’d definitely wait until then unless you don’t like your documents folder much.


macOS Mojave: 5 quick tips & tricks

Apple has recently updated its desktop operating system, macOS to version 10.14, better known as “macOS Mojave”. If you’re curious, after years of naming its operating systems after large felines, it switched a few years back to California landmarks.

The upgrade to macOS Mojave is one that you should be prompted to make if you’ve got a qualifying iMac, MacBook, MacBook Pro, Mac Mini or Mac Pro. That’s essentially most of those systems that Apple has sold from around 2012, although predictably you’ll see somewhat better performance out of a new Mac running macOS Mojave than you will an older one. There’s one curious quirk for owners of the 2012 27-inch iMac to be aware of if you’re using Apple’s “Boot Camp” software to run another operating system, such as Microsoft Windows. For that model, Boot Camp isn’t Mojave-compatible, so you’ll have to drop your Boot Camp partition to install Mojave — and you won’t be able to reinstall it after the upgrade either.

Like most Apple operating system upgrades, all you really need is a decent broadband connection for the download and a bit of time for it to upgrade. But once that’s done, what can you do freshly in macOS Mojave that you couldn’t before? This isn’t an exhaustive list — Apple’s made a lot of tweaks to the way macOS works — but just some interesting and fun features to check out:

Go Dark
Dark mode is one of Apple’s most heavily hyped features. If you prefer less eye strain — or just want to indulge your goth preferences — head to System Preferences > General to switch between the standard “Light” or new “Dark” modes for your desktop theme.

Clean up with Stacks
Apple’s offered stacks — where similar file types are collated to fan out at will — for macOS for some time, but in Mojave, you can use it to clean up your desktop. To enable it, click on “View” in the Finder (or anywhere on your desktop if you’re focused on it) and choose “enable Stacks”. As if by magic, your files and folders will magically arrange themselves.

Finder gets smarter
Apple’s replaced the iTunes-centric Cover Flow view, which let you view images and other files types as though they were album covers with Gallery view. While it uses the Cover Flow idea of a large onscreen image for each file, you gain the ability to quickly access a number of quick actions, like editing the metadata for an image or rotate it without launching a separate app.

Quick Look is faster
If you’re a long-term macOS user, you’re no doubt aware of Quick Look, which lets you peek at a photo or view a video file by hitting the space bar. In macOS Mojave, you can do a whole lot more with Quick View, including simple image editing or even clipping down video clips without sending them to iMovie, Premiere or Final Cut Pro.

More iOS interaction
If you’ve got a recent model iPhone, you can use it in concert with macOS Mojave under the new “Continuity Camera” feature, which lets you take a photo on your iPhone that’s instantly transferred to your mac. More than that, four iOS apps have made their way to macOS Mojave, with News, Stocks, Voice Memos and Home all appearing. They’re actually the iOS code running under an emulation layer on macOS Mojave, but they do point to even more cross-correlation between Apple’s software platforms in the future.


What to expect from the next Windows 10 update

Microsoft will shortly release the next major update to its Windows 10 operating system. Initially dubbed “Redstone 5” by Microsoft developers, but now known as the “October 2018 Update”, it’ll bring a slew of new security features, performance upgrades and just a few new front-facing features to your Windows 10 experience.

As with any Windows 10 upgrade, before too long you’ll probably start seeing pop-ups on your desktop advising you to upgrade, presuming you’re not already set on an automatic upgrade path by Windows 10 itself. In that case, you’ll more likely notice it the next time you power up (or power down) your PC and it runs through the installation process for the October 2018 update.

However, before you install the update, make sure you’ve got a reasonable quantity of spare space on your system.

Microsoft’s advice around the October Update is that you’ll need at least 10GB of free space before you install it. Now, on a desktop system or anything with a mechanical hard drive that’s probably not too much of an impost, but if you’ve purchased any of the much cheaper Windows 10 laptops, or some tablets running Windows 10, 10GB could represent up to a third of your available storage space!

Sadly, the October Update doesn’t warn you of this upfront. If you’re stressed about losing your precious files, the smart thing to do (which you should be doing anyway) is to back them up to an external drive or cloud storage solution.

So what will you get once the upgrade is done? Outside of bugfixes and security — which in an ideal world you’ll never really see running anyway — there’s a number of refinements and improvements on the way.

An upgraded “Your Phone” feature will enable you to see messages and notifications from a paired smartphone without having to take it out of your pocket, although there’s some difference depending on whether you’re using an Apple iPhone or an Android device. The more open nature of Android has enabled Microsoft to implement a wider set of Your Phone features for that platform, including seamless transfers of photos from Android devices to Windows desktop without having to worry about cables, synchronisation or any of that kind of hassle. If you’re using an iPhone, there’s a more limited set of features open to you, because Apple holds tighter reins on its mobile platform.

Search should be improved with better previews of multiple document types, making it easier to locate exactly the right document amongst your files. There’ll be an upgraded News app to take on services like Google News and Apple News, and while few have headsets yet, Microsoft’s also talking up improvements to its “Mixed Reality” platform for headset users of Windows 10.

So when will you see the October 2018 update arrive on your PC? The hint is in the name, but Microsoft is yet to formally ink when it’ll actually arrive. Based on prior releases, and Microsoft’s heavy work in bugfixing, the smart money is on widespread release more towards the end of October than the start.

If you’re a Mac user feeling left out, of course, you’ll see the next version of macOS drop before October, with macOS Mojave set to arrive on compatible Mac systems on 24 September 2018. As with the Windows 10 October Update, it’s wise to make sure you’ve got a backup of your personal files before upgrading to macOS Mojave.


Apple updates iOS, macOS, tvOS and watchOS, but don’t rush

As part of its launch of its new, shiny and rather expensive Apple iPhone XS range, Apple also announced when the new versions of its operating systems for all of its products will be available to consumers.

If you’re especially keen, they’ve been available for some months in beta forms, but that carries with it the risks of quite significant bugs. Apple specifically provides public betas as a form of live test to see where those bugs are, and you’re lucky if you don’t hit one of them. A test iPhone X I had running the iOS 12 beta lost the ability to make and take phone calls for a while there, which is somewhat problematic for a device that only has the letters “i” and “X” in its name if you take out the “phone”.

iOS 12, the operating system that runs iPhones, iPads and iPod Touch devices will be available from the 17th of September, and it’s probably around then that your iDevice will prompt you to upgrade. That’s the same day that Apple Watch owners will be able to upgrade to watchOS 5, and owners of compatible Apple TV set top boxes will be able to jump to tvOS 12. Again, expect to see prompts suggesting you upgrade pushed to your devices on that date, or within a few days of it. Apple marks time from its California headquarters, so depending where you are on the planet in relation to that, it might be the 18th of September instead.

Owners of Macintosh computers such as Macbooks, iMacs, Mac Pros or Mac Minis will have to wait a little longer to see the next generation of macOS, but not by much. That’s because macOS Mojave is set to fully release on 24 September, again at Apple’s timing whim.

Apple doesn’t charge a fee for downloading these updates, although you do need to have a machine capable of running the upgrade. For iOS 12, that’s the following devices:

  • iPhone 5s and later
  • iPad Air
  • iPad Pro
  • iPad 5th and 6th generation
  • iPad mini 2
  • iPod touch 6th generation

If your iOS device is older than that — and especially if it won’t already update to iOS 11 — then you won’t even be offered the update. For Apple Watch users, it’s everything but the very first generation of Apple Watches, the ones that Apple now refers to as “Apple Watch Original” models.

For Apple TV, it’s any 4th generation Apple TV — which means the 4th generation model and “4K” Apple TV only.

For macs, there’s a little variance depending on whether you’re updating a MacBook, Mac Mini, iMac or Mac Pro, but the basic cutoff line is 2012. If you’re using a Mac of any type that’s from the 2013 generation of any of those lines or newer, you’ll be able to run macOS Mojave.

So they’re free, and as long as you have the data pipe to get them they won’t cost you anything. So, rush out to download as soon as they’re available, right?

Not so fast — especially if you’re running a Mac. The reality with new OS upgrades is that while Apple does a lot of hard work in squashing bugs, you’re still talking billions of lines of code, and that means that bugs are all but inevitable. You most definitely should not upgrade until you’ve got a good backup in place of all your critical data, because while catastrophic errors are rare, they’re not impossible. Smart money says that within a few weeks, Apple will release “point” updates to deal with the most egregious bugs, and it’s around that time that it might make more sense to update.

All of these upgrades — and the same story is true on the Windows and Android sides of the IT fence, by the way — shouldn’t be ignored, because they also add important security updates to your devices. I’m certainly not stating you should never upgrade. Just that while Apple might hype the new features, unless you need them, there’s really no rush.


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